Hakodate

Like Otaru, Hakodate is not the first city you think of visiting in Japan. But the ship stopped there so we did too. That’s Mount Hakodate with all the radio towers on top.

We are glad it was one of our ports-they pulled out all the stops to welcome us. From what appeared to be the retired postal workers greeting us with a big welcome banner and shouting “Haarow” to us as we walked onto the pier to the school kids places throughout the town to assist us. We understand the schools use this volunteer assistance as part of their English language courses.

Hakodate provided shuttle buses to run us the 15 minute drive from the ferry and industrial port into downtown dropping us off at the train station. This would prove advantageous later in the day.

We followed the crowds and the advice of the school girls whose answer to most questions was a big smile, a handpoint to the left and “Morning Market that way”.

What a market it was-inside, outside just everywhere for several blocks. Seafood, fruits and vegetables. But as in Otaru not inexpensive-the crabs below range in price from about $20 up to about $50 for the large one in the right.

The highlight of our market visit for me though was my non verbal interaction with one of the vendors. She and her boss were giggling and nodding my way, she smiled and came over to see how tall she was beside me. We both started laughing when we realized my walking stick was as tall as she was!

From the market we walked several blocks to the “Brick Warehouses”. These former warehouses have been renovated into shopping and restaurants. It’s a great use for these and I suspect what Otaru hopes to do with the buildings along their canal.

Thankfully Lois isn’t along on this trip as I am sure we would never have gotten her away from the shops!

We ran into some friends from aboard who were sightseeing with two of the activities director’s staff and they mentioned they were heading to have ramen in a place they knew about. Unfortunately Mike and I ate too big a breakfast and weren’t ready for lunch and later when we tried to go there the place was packed. Since the clouds were turning darker we decided we better head to Fort Goryokaku. We took the tram from downtown out to the park, about a 15 minute ride. The city sells a day pass for about $5.50 and the tourist map had great instructions including step by step how to buy the pass on the tram and which stop to get off and even pictures of each intersection on the 15 minute walk from tram to the park. The one think they didn’t explain was what a one day pass was called in Japanese. So before we got too far from all the helpful students, I asked how to say “one day pass” in Japanese. The response I got was a smile and “onedaypass”. I smiled and said yes, how do I ask for a one day pass. “Onedaypass” was again stated to me with a smile. Finally on the third try of what ended up seeming like a “whose on first” comedy act, I realized that the Japanese word for what I wanted was the English word for it’ 😂

This fort which was built to protect the port and the Magistrate’s House (Governor’s office?) in the late 1800s is one of a couple of handfuls built in this style.

It is currently a park open to the public and while pretty now is I am sure quite beautiful when flowers are in bloom.

The highlight of the park for us though was the Magistrate’s House.

This building is a reconstruction of the original main building. It was built using the exact same techniques as the original-hand made ceramic tiles which are tied with wire together, wooden decorative carvings with hand hammered metal at the gables, all the joints are notched and pegged so no nails or screws.

While I wish it had of been built to a larger scale (ole Frank Lloyd Wright would have felt right at home) it was just beautiful and the details incredible.

We were lucky enough to have one of the docents take us under her wing (I think she enjoyed showing off her great English skills and was obviously proud of the house). She told us it’s history, explained how they could only build the main portion as otherwise it would be too large for current building codes for wooden structures.

We loved the original wooden urinal and toilet-I wish we had some this beautiful today!

Below are some photographs of the exhibits relating to the rebuilding including a structural model and samples of some of the joints

By the time we finished in the park it was close to 2 and the skies were continuing to darken so we hurried back to the tram and to the train station.

We purchased (as one must) rail passes in the US before we left. In order to use the pass we had to turn the voucher we bought into the pass. We decided that might be easier at the smaller Hakodate station rather than one of the busier ones in Tokyo. So we spent our last 30 minutes or so in the city doing that paperwork and making seat reservations for the bullet train from Tokyo to Kyoto we will take on Monday after we get off the ship. We even got seats on the right side of the train so hopefully the weather will cooperate and we will be able to see Mount Fuji.

We made it back to the ship just before the skies opened up and unlike most nights when we laugh at the old folks who are in line at 5:30 when the dining room opens-we were with them. After nothing to eat we were hongry! And after walking 4.5 miles (on what I thought might be an easy day since there was a shuttle to town!) we also were in bed before some folks had even gone to dinner.

Unfortunately because of the early dinner, we didn’t get to completely enjoy the sendoff from Hakodate. Through the dining room window we got glimpses of all those students arriving in school buses and standing in the rain, jumping up and down and waving flashlights as we left port!

So if you get a chance to go to Hakodate, we suggest you go!

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